How I De-bug my Rugs

My method for removing dust and invisible pests from floors and rugs:

  1. Obtain normal cooking/table salt.
  2. Pour salt into mortar (of mortar and pestle), add one drop of bergamot essential oil and grind salt into a fine powder.  Keep away from skin.  Make sure there is enough salt to cover all rugs.
  3. Sprinkle powdered, scented salt onto rugs.*  Let sit for at least a few hours but preferably for a few days.
  4. Sweep up resulting salt-dust patches.  Breathe easier.

*If using essential oils, make sure pets, especially cats, are not in the vicinity.   To avoid inhaling the powder, fill a salt shaker and sprinkle close to the floor.

saltrug

I haven’t confirmed (with a microscope and experience) that this method is effective in getting rid of dust mites after an infestation.  A real infestation would require more work, like laundering, steam cleaning and fumigating.  I use this method instead of my previous washing soda/baking soda method to get a more thorough floor and rug cleaning, so it is a (fun) weekly routine that I follow to prevent an infestation and the sickness that comes with one.  In the summer, the hot and humid weather can encourage an infestation, and in the winter, the heating, darkness and reduced air circulation also favor dust mite growth.

I got the main idea for this procedure from a patent for killing dust mites with various salts (US5271947 A).  I’m not sure that table salt (sodium chloride) alone is a powerful acaracide (mite killer), but I believe that it is very effective when powdered and mixed with bergamot oil.

Sodium chloride is a well-known dessicant, so it could dry out the mites.  Grinding the salt into a powder makes it more effective, because the newly exposed surfaces can absorb more moisture from the air, cloths and insects.  The powder can also travel deeper into rugs than regular salt crystals from the box.  The real danger of dust mites are the chronic allergic reactions that can occur in response to their feces and dead body parts.  The salt can help grab these allergens (through electrostatic interactions), so that the allergens can be swept up along with the salt.

Bergamot (Citrus bergamia) oil is a somewhat well-known antibacterial, fungicidal and insecticidal agent.  It contains furocoumarins, in particular bergamottin and bergaptenGrapefruit also has these compounds and effects, and the ‘grapefruit juice effect‘ (interaction with many medications) is due to certain furocoumarins.  The furocoumarins are also toxic to insects and mammals that come into contact with them and are exposed to sunlight (phototoxic).  Raw bergamot/grapefruit oil should not be applied to the skin (without proper medical instruction).

I love the calming, other-worldly smell of bergamot from the salt (also in Earl Grey tea) and haven’t had any reaction after walking on the scented salt barefoot, but I am still cautious with the concentrated chemicals.  I only use one drop each time and don’t go out in the sun right away.  The salt is used to absorb/release, dilute and disperse the essential oil throughout the area.

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Living with water contaminated with microbes

Unfortunately, for about a week now and still counting, the municipal water for most of the state of Hessen has been deemed contaminated with E. coli [Hessenschau].  The cause is unknown, but there was an outbreak of pathogenic E. coli in 2011 [Eurosurveillance].  To combat this problem, the state is further contaminating the water with chlorine bleach.

Fortunately, this situation forced me to think about when and how much water we use carelessly or unnecessarily.  It also inspired me to think of solutions for people who have similar water contamination problems, temporarily or chronically.

My advice for action after finding out that your water is contaminated with dangerous microbes:

  1. Don’t panic!  The body has many lines of defense, including the skin, mucous-lined airways, stomach acid, pancreatic and bile secretions and inflammatory responses, against pathogenic bacteria, yeasts and viruses [Merck Manual].  Support your body with healthy thoughts and a sufficient amount of nutrients.
  2. Get clean drinking water.  Germany has an abundance of natural springs, so bottled spring water is very cheap (literally cheaper than dirt), possibly more so than tap water, and all bottled water is highly regulated [EFBW].  If you have use for clean tap water, it needs to be freshly sanitized through boiling at a rolling boil for 1 to 3 minutes, depending on elevation/boiling point, to kill bacteria [CDC].  I’ve been using tap water boiled in an electric kettle to make tea, cook grains (for couscous – just add boiling water), blanche vegetables and (after cooling) water houseplants.  Distilled water is also an option but may not be necessary for a microbial contamination.  Caution:  Drinking too much DW too fast can cause bodily distress and even death [How Stuff Works].
  3. Use coldest setting of tap water.  Since tap water can only reach up to 60 deg C (for skin safety and material protection), and since microbes only start to be killed at 70 deg C, using hot tap water to ‘sanitize’ is not justified.  Hot water can remove protective oils and denature structural and functional proteins in your skin, leaving you open to infection.  Hot water also causes pores in the skin to open.  Cold water is astringent, meaning it causes your pores to close.  You can feel this as your skin tightening.  This is good for preventing microbes and toxins from entering your body through your skin.
  4. Shower wisely.  Take a short, cold shower if needed.  Avoid getting water on cuts and body openings.  Consider a sponge bath.  I actually enjoy an oatmeal sponge bath and hair wash:  1)  Fill sock with oats and knot it.  2)  Soak it in warm sanitized water until the oats are softened.  3)  Rub over skin.  4)  Rinse hair with resulting oat-water (looks milky).  5)  Dry/Rub off residue with a towel and apply moisturizer.  This is very soothing for itchy skin.
  5. Use probiotics.  Your gut lining needs microbes, including non-pathogenic E. coli, to properly function.  Antibiotics, synthetic or natural, destroy microbes and open up real estate, which  should then be populated with beneficial microbes.  Good sources of probiotics are easy to make yourself, such as fermented fruit juice (ex: hard cider), kombucha, unpasteurized vinegar (super easy), sauerkraut and kefir (sour, not spoiled, milk).  You can also clean broken skin, fruits/vegetables and surfaces with strong vinegar.
  6. Go medieval on your food.  Wash your food down with mead, wine or (real) beer.  These are probiotic detoxifying digestive aids.  Load raw or difficult-to-sanitize foods (fish, meats, especially chicken) with antibiotic digestive aids, like citrus zest and herbs [learn about medieval herbs on gardeningknowhow].  Traditional Medicine, both Western and Eastern, focuses a lot more on increasing bile secretions and moving fluids through the body than Modern Medicine.  Stretching and exercise are also needed to keep the lymphatic (infection-fighting) system working properly.